Zombie game for Android found to be stealing personal data

By Elliot James | News | 28 June 2019
Your data is in danger

Scary Granny ZOMBY Mod, downloaded 50,000 times, was harvesting credentials, researchers found

An Android game called Scary Granny ZOMBY Mod: The Horror Game 2019 has been discovered to be maliciously targeting users to steal personal data.

The game was downloaded over 50,000 times before researchers from the mobile security company Wandera identified the application as potentially harmful to users. The app would ask some users to enter their Google account details. The victim's username and password would then be used to collect personal data from the account with as yet unknown intent, according to a report by Cyberscoop.

The malicious app seemed only to target newer Android phones, with operating systems released after Oreo. It is unknown how many of the 50,000 users' had their data compromised.

The app is a clear take on Granny, which has more than 100 million downloads on the Google Play Store to date.

The app listing on the Play Store said that in-app purchases would feature, but the large number of full-screen advertisements and borderline unavoidable payments that featured on the app were excessive, even in the world of online games. And although the app was listed as free on the Play Store, upon opening the app users were informed that in order to close the first full-screen ad and access the game, a total of £18 would have to be paid. While it was possible to avoid this payment, the screen automatically populated with some of the users' wallet information.

When asking for Google account details, the game would place a seemingly unclosable page on the user's screen that faked a Google login page, asking users to "sing in" rather than sign in. While victims were using the app, the account details would be used to find their recovery email address, recovery phone numbers, birth date, verification codes, as well as some cookies and tokens.

"There is no doubt in my mind that this app is malicious and puts private user data at risk," Michael Covington, vice president of product at Wandera, told Cyberscoop. "It's logging into the profile section of your Gmail and going through tab by tab and taking screenshots of your personal information. It's taking all of that data and sending it somewhere."

The developer of the game was given as Top Games Studio.,jlk. The developer's site directed to an unregistered domain and the email address listed on the Play Store was fake. No other games on the Play store were found from this developer. The game has now been removed.

NASA Dragonfly mission will explore Saturn's largest moon Titan

By Dev Kundaliya | News | 28 June 2019
A composite image showing an infrared view of Saturn's moon Titan. Image: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona/University of Idaho

NASA's Dragonfly mission will search for the signs of "the building blocks of life" on Titan, Saturn's largest moon

NASA is planning a new mission, codenamed Dragonfly, to explore Saturn's largest moon Titan to search for the signs of "the building blocks of life".

The mission will launch in 2026 and will arrive at Titan in 2034.

Dragonfly is a Mars rover-sized drone that will be able to fly from place to place on Titan

Titan is the second largest natural satellite in the solar system, and even bigger than Mercury, the planet closest to the Sun. Due to its distance from the Sun (about 1,435 million kilometres), it is very cold, with surface temperature of about -179 degrees Celsius.

It is characterised by a nitrogen-based atmosphere, and also features clouds and methane rain.

While Titan is icy it is also similar to Earth in a number of ways. The data collected by the Cassini mission suggests that this "richly, organic world" contains some of the ingredients that are required for the emergence of life.


Computing's Cloud Excellence Awards return on the 19th September 2019, recognising the very best of cloud computing in the UK across end users, suppliers and products. Who is the Cloud Architect of the Year? What is the Best Cloud Development Platform? And who is the Cloud Entrepreneur of the Year. Entry is FREE - the deadline is Friday 28th June


Dragonfly is the latest space mission announced under NASA's New Frontiers programme.

"Dragonfly is a Mars rover-sized drone that will be able to fly from place to place on Titan," said Elizabeth Turtle, the lead investigator of Dragonfly mission.

The flying rotorcraft will have capabilities to touch down in multiple locations, ranging from dunes to the floor of a known impact crater on Titan. It will be three metres long and three metres wide, and will feature rotors that that will enable it to soar across Titan's surface at a rate of 12-14 kilometres an hour.

Dragonfly will visit a world filled with a wide variety of organic compounds, which are the building blocks of life

The craft will make a hop about once every 16 days, although it will also make shorter hops of a few feet in case scientists detect something interesting in close vicinity. In total, it will cover more than 175 kilometres of Titan's surface during its mission, according to NASA.

Initially, the Dragonfly mission is expected to last just under three years. During that time, it will explore multiple sites across Saturn's moon, including the Shangri-La dune field and Selk impact crater.

The spacecraft will carry with it multiple scientific instruments that will enable it to measure soil samples and to search for signs of past or existing life on Titan. The quadcopter will also collect soil samples at different sites across the moon's surface.

"It's remarkable to think of this rotorcraft flying miles and miles across the organic sand dunes of Saturn's largest moon, exploring the processes that shape this extraordinary environment," said Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator for Science at the NASA's Headquarters in Washington.

"Dragonfly will visit a world filled with a wide variety of organic compounds, which are the building blocks of life and could teach us about the origin of life itself."

"Titan is unlike any other place in the solar system, and Dragonfly is like no other mission."

Computing and CRN have united to present the Women in Tech Festival UK 2019, on 17 September in London.

The event will celebrate successful women in the IT industry, enabling attendes to hear about, and to share, personal experiences of professional journeys and challenges.

Whether you're the ‘Next Generation', an ‘Inspirational Leader', or an ‘Innovator of Tech' this event will offer inspiration on not only how to improve yourself, but how to help others too.  The event is FREE for qualifying IT pros, but places will go fast

Ofcom's ruling that Openreach must open up infrastructure to rivals approved by EC

By Elliot James | News | 28 June 2019
Openreach: more poles, duct and dark fibre to be opened up to rivalsto

Move would allow rivals to supply 5G services to the lucrative enterprise sector

The European Commission (EC) has given the UK telecom regulator Ofcom permission to impose a new ruling on BT Openreach regarding access to its infrastructure.

Between them, competing providers are currently using around 12,000 Openreach telegraph poles and 2,500 km of underground duct, but Ofcom wants these figures to increase, as well as to open up Openreach's dark fibre networks for use by other providers.

Ofcom regulates the TV and radio sectors, fixed line telecoms, mobile communications, postal services and the airwaves over which wireless devices operate. The regulator has pushed for rivals to be given more access to Openreach's infrastructure for some time, and support from the EC should further this goal.  

The draft regulations were originally published in May and have not undergone any significant changes since then. They are designed to give rival firms better access to Openreach's infrastructure. A former monopoly provider, through its Openreach subsidiary BT still controls the majority of the UK's broadband infrastructure such as poles, ducts and dark fibre networks. Rival providers have long complained that this situation has stymied their progress.

Openreach is already required to let rival companies use its poles and underground tunnels to lay their own fibre networks, under rules set by Ofcom last year. Until now, however, access has only been available to companies focusing on the residential and small-business sector, whereas the new ruling would extend it to rivals serving large businesses, and providers of high speed and mobile networks.

"Companies laying high-speed fibre cables for broadband and mobile networks will benefit from greater access to Openreach's telegraph poles and underground tunnels," Ofcom says.

The new regulation will also allow competitors to "light up" Openreach's fibre using their own equipment. Ofcom says this "would significantly reduce the cost for mobile and broadband operators to connect their networks, without undermining their incentives to lay new, competing fibre cables where it is economic to do so". 

Extending access to Openreach's fibre infrastructure to business networks would improve the business case for firms wishing to invest in 5G networks. Enterprise services over 5G are predicted to highly profitable for telecoms businesses.

EU approves IBM's $34 billion acquisition of Red Hat

By Dev Kundaliya | News | 28 June 2019
Deal between IBM and Red Hat was agreed last October

European Commission concludes that IBM's proposed takeover of Red Hat posed no competition concerns

The European Commission has unconditionally approved IBM's $34 billion takeover of open-source software maker Red Hat.

In a statement, the European Commission said that following an investigation, it concluded that the proposed deal "would raise no competition concerns".

Since IBM doesn't stand among the top two companies in the cloud computing market, and isn't dominant in any sector in which Red Hat is also present, there was no reason for regulators to believe that the merger would raise competition concerns. 

"During its investigation, the Commission assessed the impact of the proposed transaction on the markets for middleware and system infrastructure software, where the activities of IBM and Red Hat overlap," the Commission said in its statement.


Computing's Cloud Excellence Awards return on the 19th September 2019, recognising the very best of cloud computing in the UK across end users, suppliers and products. Who is the Cloud Architect of the Year? What is the Best Cloud Development Platform? And who is the Cloud Entrepreneur of the Year. Entry is FREE - the deadline is Friday 28th June


"The Commission found that the merged entity would continue to face significant competition from other players in all potential markets."

The antitrust agency also said that it "took note" of the argument that the merger could actually increase competition in the market.

The deal between IBM and Red Hat was announced last October. EU's approval has finally cleared a big hurdle for the IBM's biggest acquisition to date.

The Commission found that the merged entity would continue to face significant competition from other players in all potential markets

The EU's antitrust agency was the last major authority to give approval for the IBM-Red Hat deal. The deal was cleared last month in the US.

IBM believes the buyout of Red Hat would enable it to expand its subscription-based software offerings and to also address the declining demand for its mainframe servers as well as the software.

IBM - once known primarily for its computer hardware - has changed its priorities in the past years. The company is focusing more on cloud computing now, like Microsoft and Amazon, to remain viable in the market and to create new growth opportunities for itself.

Following the merger, Red Hat will become a unit of IBM's Hybrid Cloud division. It will be an all-cash deal and IBM will pay Red Hat stockholders $190 per share, according to CNBC.

Red Hat was founded in 1993 to distribute Linux, and Unix software. However, the company took advantage of the boom in popularity of Linux in the late 1990s and early 2000s by focusing on the enterprise. 

Based in Raleigh, North Carolina, it has a workforce of around 12,000 people, and a presence in 35 countries. Today, Red Hat distributes and supports Red Hat Enterprise Linux, as well as other enterprise and data centre software.

Computing and CRN have united to present the Women in Tech Festival UK 2019, on 17 September in London.

The event will celebrate successful women in the IT industry, enabling attendes to hear about, and to share, personal experiences of professional journeys and challenges.

Whether you're the ‘Next Generation', an ‘Inspirational Leader', or an ‘Innovator of Tech' this event will offer inspiration on not only how to improve yourself, but how to help others too.  The event is FREE for qualifying IT pros, but places will go fast

Automation 'likely to make low-income work redundant', but won't lead to job losses

By Tom Allen | News | 28 June 2019
A separate recent report warned that automation could replace as many as 20 million manufacturing jobs by 2030

Enthusiasm is high among business leaders, but there are concerns around privacy

Much has been written about the impact of automation on jobs, including on this very site. People around the world think that automation will make them worse off due to job losses, but experts at the Bank of England say that the impact has been overstated, especially in the UK. IT leaders have the same view, generally believing that automation will supplement, rather than replace, jobs.

A new report from the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) comes down on the side of the professionals. Based on a survey of more than 500 business leaders in eight countries (mostly in developed nations like the UK, Germany and Singapore), the main takeaway is that enthusiasm is high, but job losses do not necessarily result.

85 per cent of those in the survey said that automation, by taking away repetitive tasks, helps people to lead happier lives. 88 per cent said that it will ‘accelerate human achievement'. Clearly, executives are willing to pursue automation with zeal.

More than 90 per cent of respondents to the survey are already using automation in some fashion, although reluctance remains around widespread adoption. There are specific concerns around data privacy and security, for example.

However, while three-quarters of business leaders admitted that automation is likely to ‘make low-income work redundant', they also believe that it is unlikely to entirely replace those employees: nearly 80 per cent said that automation is most effective when it complements humans.

42 per cent of C-level executives said that it was important to educate and reskill the workforce in order to accommodate industry changes, and alleviate employee fears about job losses.

Emily Wasik of the EIU said, "Automation adoption has exploded. We used to think of robots as the domain of the manufacturing industry, but it's clear that automation tools are now in widespread operation in businesses across all sectors."

"While the operational benefits of automation - including increased productivity and error reduction - are well-known, the perceived undercutting of the workforce has been a persistent obstacle to adoption."

"This report shows that executives do not see automation technologies as a substitute for workers. On the contrary, the prevailing view is that automation will accelerate human achievement, increase employee happiness and reduce levels of stress."

The report was released following analysis by Oxford Economics, saying that automation could replace as many as 20 million manufacturing jobs worldwide by 2030.

Biometrics commissioner criticises police's 'chaotic' use of facial recognition

By Dev Kundaliya | News | 28 June 2019
The Met and South Wales Police have already trialed facial recognition at public events. Image via Pixabay

Met Police and South Wales Police have already trialed facial recognition at public events

The UK's biometrics commissioner Paul Wiles has issued a warning over the "chaotic" way in which police forces have been using facial recognition. He called for a clear legal framework for the use of such technology. 

In his annual report [PDF], Wiles also voiced concern over the lack of clear rules for government use of biometric databases, which poses "clear risks of abuse" and risks to civil liberties. 

In the UK, the Metropolitan Police and South Wales Police have already trialed facial recognition at public events, including the Champions League Final at Cardiff's Millenniums Stadium and the Notting Hill Carnival in London. However, both forces have been challenged in court regarding the use of the technology.

The Metropolitan Police is facing legal action over its use of facial recognition in public by campaign group Big Brother Watch

According to Wiles, police deployment of facial recognition ran ahead of the law. In the absence of a legal framework, it has been left to the police to determine whether the public benefit outweighs the "significant intrusion into an individual's privacy".

In the report, Wiles also raised his concern over the Ministry of Defence (MoD) searching the police national fingerprint database without an agreed lawful basis.

The MoD uses the database to verify whether fingerprints taken during a foreign military operation match an individual known to the police or immigration authorities. Wiles said that he has challenged the MoD several times in recent months over the direct access granted to the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl) to search the police's fingerprint databases.

The report also highlights the "serious risk" that public safety has been put at because of the failure of police to collect DNA samples from people suspected of violence, rape and sex offences.


AI & Machine Learning Live is returning to London on 3rd July 2019. Hear from the Met Office's Charles Ewen, AutoTrader lead data scientist Dr David Hoyle and the BBC's Noriko Matsuoka, among many others. Attendance is free to qualifying IT leaders and senior IT pros, but places are limited, so reserve yours now.


Seven years ago, the Home Office introduced restrictions on police officers' right to arrest suspects. Because of those rules, as well as the restrictions on the use of police bail, there have been increasing instances where suspects are asked to come for "voluntary interviews" rather than being arrested by the police.

Wiles warned that fewer DNA profiles and fingerprints collection "will lead to a long-term decline in the utility of police biometrics".

Responding to the issues raised by Wiles in his annual report Baroness Williams of Trafford, Minister of State for Countering Extremism, commented: "This year the government has been working to improve governance and oversight arrangements of biometrics in particular new emerging biometrics".

"This includes setting up the Law Enforcement Facial Images and New Biometrics Oversight and Advisory Board to improve coordination between relevant parties on top of existing arrangements for fingerprints and DNA for which you have statutory responsibilities."

Biometrics enables individuals to be identified based on a set of verifiable and recognisable data, which are specific and unique to them.

Biometrics includes unique bodily features, such as gait, voice and face. Facial recognition is one aspect of the biometrics technology, which can be used to scan crowds or CCTV footage to search for people of interest. However, the accuracy of such technology has often been called into question. 

Computing and CRN have united to present the Women in Tech Festival UK 2019, on 17 September in London.

The event will celebrate successful women in the IT industry, enabling attendes to hear about, and to share, personal experiences of professional journeys and challenges.

Whether you're the ‘Next Generation', an ‘Inspirational Leader', or an ‘Innovator of Tech' this event will offer inspiration on not only how to improve yourself, but how to help others too.  The event is FREE for qualifying IT pros, but places will go fast

Design guru Jony Ive to leave Apple

By Elliot James | News | 28 June 2019
Ive: off to create his own firm LoveForm

Insists the time is right, but coincides with iPhone's worsening fortunes

Apple's chief design officer Sir Jony Ive will leave the company later this year to start his own firm.

The new company, named LoveFrom, will be an independent design consultancy, with Apple as its first client.

London-born Ive's designs have been key to Apple's success and its status as a $1 trillion company. He was also a close creative collaborator with Apple co-founder Steve Jobs. Ive designed many iconic Apple products including the iMac in 1998, the iPod in 2001, the iPhone in 2007, the MacBook Air in 2008, the iPad in 2010, the Apple Watch in 2015 and most recently AirPods in 2016. Apple CEO Tim Cook said his "role in Apple's revival cannot be overstated".

An article from the BBC describes Jobs and Ives as "the Lennon and McCartney of Apple", and Steve Jobs once said: "If I had a spiritual partner at Apple, it's Jony".

In addition to his role at Apple, Ive is also currently chancellor of the Royal College of Art, where he succeeded James Dyson.

Ive has said in response to the announcement: "After nearly 30 years and countless projects, I am most proud of the lasting work we have done to create a design team, process and culture at Apple that is without peer.

"This just seems like a natural and gentle time to make this change".

Nevertheless, his departure comes at a time when iPhone sales have been falling, including a record drop in Apple's most recent quarter.

LoveFrom will be California-based "for now" and Ive will continue to work on Apple devices alongside "personal passions" including non-Apple projects.

"I have the utmost confidence in my designer colleagues at Apple, who remain my closest friends, and I look forward to working with them for many years to come," Ive said.

Russian search giant Yandex hacked by Western intelligence agencies to spy on developers

By Dev Kundaliya | News | 28 June 2019
Yandex is Russia's answer to Google

Yandex hack occurred between October and November 2018 when Regin malware associated with the NSA was found

Hackers linked with Western intelligence agencies attacked Russian search giant Yandex last year in a bid to spy on user accounts.

Four people with knowledge of the matter told Reuters that the company found malware, called Regin, associated with the intelligence agencies of the US, UK, Australia, New Zealand and Canada. 

The malware targeted Yandex's research and development unit and was present for a number of weeks. 

Yandex is Russia's answer to Google, known for offering an array of online services to users predominantly based in Russia, Kazakhstan, Turkey and other countries. It claims to have more than 108 million monthly users in Russia.


AI & Machine Learning Live is returning to London on 3rd July 2019. Hear from the Met Office's Charles Ewen, AutoTrader lead data scientist Dr David Hoyle and the BBC's Noriko Matsuoka, among many others. Attendance is free to qualifying IT leaders and senior IT pros, but places are limited, so reserve yours now.


The incident occurred between October and November last year, according to Reuters' sources, when Yandex security teams suspected a malware outbreak on developer's PCs. Security specialists from Kaspersky were called in, who confirmed the attack, identified the type of malware and suggested that hackers were targeting a group of programmers inside Yandex.

The assessment by Kaspersky indicated that the attackers were most likely working for Western intelligence agencies, although the country responsible for the cyber attack couldn't be determined.

The purpose of the attack, according to Kaspersky, was cyber espionage rather than acquisition of intellectual property or destruction of systems or network.

Security experts also claimed that some code used in the malware discovered by Yandex was not used in any other previously known cyber attack.

According to the files leaked by former US National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden, Regin was developed by the NSA and GCHQ to spy on companies, individuals, and governments around the world. 

"Regin is the crown jewel of attack frameworks used for espionage. Its architecture, complexity and capability sits in a ballpark of its own," Vikram Thakur, technical director at Symantec Security Response, told Reuters. "We have seen different components of Regin in the past few months," Thakur added.

Yandex spokesman Ilya Grabovsky acknowledged the attack, but didn't provide any further details. "This particular attack was detected at a very early stage by the Yandex security team," Grabovsky told Reuters.

"It was fully neutralised before any damage was done," he added.

Cloud & Infrastructure Live 2019 returns to London on 19th September 2019. Learn about the latest technologies in cloud, how to keep one step ahead of the regulators, and network with an audience of IT leaders and senior IT pros. The event will include keynotes, panel discussions, case studies, and strategic and technical streams. Best of all, the event is FREE to qualifying attendees. Secure your place now.

Attending Cloud & Infrastructure Live 2019 already? Why not enter the Computing Cloud Excellence Awards that will be celebrated in the evening, too?

Researchers discover vulnerability in the Microsoft Excel tool

By Nicholas Fearn | News | 28 June 2019

Excel spreadsheet vulnerability enables cyber criminals to launch attacks on unwitting users

Security researchers have identified a vulnerability in Microsoft Excel that enables attackers to embed malicious payloads. 

According to Mimecast's Threat Center, cyber criminals can mount a Dynamic Data Exchange attack through a spreadsheet and control the Payload Power Query remotely.

With Power Query, users are able to integrate spreadsheets with data sources, such as external databases, text, documents and webpages, before saving them in a spreadsheet. 

But Ofir Shlomo, who led the research team, claims the feature can also be used for launching "sophisticated, hard-to-detect attacks that combine several attack surfaces". 

He said: "Using Power Query, attackers could embed malicious content in a separate data source, and then load the content into the spreadsheet when it is opened. 


AI & Machine Learning Live is returning to London on 3rd July 2019. Hear from the Met Office's Charles Ewen, AutoTrader lead data scientist Dr David Hoyle and the BBC's Noriko Matsuoka, among many others. Attendance is free to qualifying IT leaders and senior IT pros, but places are limited, so reserve yours now.


"The malicious code could be used to drop and execute malware that can compromise the user's machine."

Shlomo added that the feature boasts rich controls that enable attackers to fingerprint a sandbox or a victim's machine before delivering payloads. 

This vulnerability also provides the attacker with potential pre-payload and pre-exploitation controls, as well as enabling them to launch an attack through a file that appears harmless. 

"The Power Query feature is designed to allow you to embed remote content easily and dynamically. Such attacks are usually hard to detect and gives threat actors more chances to compromise the victim's host," said Shlomo.

"Using the potential weakness in Power Query, attackers could potentially embed any malicious payload that, as designed, won't be saved inside the document itself, but downloaded from the web when the document is opened."

To demonstrate the effectiveness of this method, the research team loaded an external webpage containing the payload into a spreadsheet. 

Shlomo said it could "write a custom, simple HTTP server to host the payload on a web page to be served". He continued: "The HTTP server listened locally on port 80 and served DDE content as a response when a request was received from the spreadsheet."

After reporting the flaw to Microsoft, the tech giant published a security advisory outlining steps users can take to mitigate such attacks.

Microsoft said: "An attacker could leverage the DDE protocol by sending a specially crafted file to the user and then convincing the user to open the file, typically by way of an enticement in an email. 

"The attacker would have to convince the user to disable Protected Mode and click through one or more additional prompts. As email attachments are a primary method an attacker could use to spread malware, Microsoft strongly recommends that customers exercise caution when opening suspicious file attachments."

Cloud & Infrastructure Live 2019 returns to London on 19th September 2019. Learn about the latest technologies in cloud, how to keep one step ahead of the regulators, and network with an audience of IT leaders and senior IT pros. The event will include keynotes, panel discussions, case studies, and strategic and technical streams. Best of all, the event is FREE to qualifying attendees. Secure your place now.

Attending Cloud & Infrastructure Live 2019 already? Why not enter the Computing Cloud Excellence Awards that will be celebrated in the evening, too?

Deepfakes should be treated 'differently' from other online misinformation, says Zuckerberg

By Elliot James | News | 27 June 2019
The Zuckerberg deepfake video is still on Instagram

But Facebook CEO offers no immediate solutions to the disinformation problem

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has admitted that the company has yet to come up with a strategy for dealing with deepfake videos.

Speaking at an event in Aspen, Colorado, on Wednesday, Zuckerberg said: "We are going through the policy process of thinking through what the deepfake policy should be," adding: "the policies continue to evolve as technology develops".

Deepfake videos, footage altered by AI to make it appear that the person in the video is doing or saying something that they are not, have already been used for the purpose of spreading political disinformation. An example is the recent video featuring US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi slurring her words during a speech as if drunk, which as the original footage shows, never actually happened. Facebook was slow to remove the video due to an apparent "execution mistake". This led to strong complaints from several Democrats, with more than 25 sending Zuckerberg a letter saying they were "concerned that you and your company are not taking these occurrences seriously and are grossly unprepared for the 2020 elections."

A deepfake video of Zuckerberg was posted to Instagram, which Facebook owns, on 11 June. The video was posted not for the purpose of misinformation, but in order to provoke a response from Zuckerberg and to see if a video featuring Zuckerberg himself would be taken down more quickly. However, the video was not taken down and remains on the site.

Zuckerberg alluded to concerns over perceived censorship on the site, saying, cryptically, "I do not think we want to go so far towards saying that a private company prevents you from saying something that it thinks is factually incorrect to another person".

The main concern regarding deepfake videos is that fakes will soon be indistinguishable from the real thing, further blurring the boundaries between fact and fiction, and undermining trust in all reportage. Although AI is a massively innovative field with many potential positives, there are also disturbing implications that the technology could be used for disinformation, blackmail, framing, or potentially even to start a war.

Zuckerberg said that deepfakes may need to be treated in a different way from other forms of misinformation, which many believe Facebook has failed to manage properly.

"It is likely sensible to have a different policy and to treat this differently than how we just treat normal, false information on the internet," he said.